The gender roles of electra and clytemnestra in the play oresteia by aeschylus

Proteus Although Proteus, the satyr play which originally followed the first three plays of The Oresteia, is lost, except for a two-line fragment preserved by Athenaeusit is widely believed to have been based on the story told in Book IV of Homer 's Odysseywhere Menelaus, Agamemmnon's brother, attempts to return home from Troy and finds himself on an island off Egypt.

Whom shall I add besides, to our faction?

Implications of Gender Roles in Oresteia

This theme of the polis self-governed by consent through lawful institutions, as opposed to tribalism and superstitionrecurs in Greek art and thought.

Clytemnestra does not hide from her actions, instead she freely admits the murder and embraces the power and authority. He is accompanied by his newest concubine, Cassandra, the daughter of the king of Troy. Orestes tries to justify the murder of his mother, but in the final scene of the play he is afflicted with madness and flees in terror from the Furies, hideous spirits who hunt down and punish murderers.

In his entourage comes Cassandra, the captive Trojan princess cursed with prophecy, whom Agamemnon plans to make his mistress. Unfortunately for Clytemnestra though Apollo brings up that Athena was never born by natural birth and never had a mother to raise her. The expedition assembled at Aulis, on the eastern coast of Greece, but was unable to sail for Troy because of adverse winds.

Athena then renames them Eumenides The Kindly Onesand they will now be honored by the citizens of Athens and ensure the city's prosperity.

It might be argued that this is particularly well represented by Clytemnestra, the murderer, taking charge of the burial of her husband. Can I with piety ask the gods for that? Is this why Orestes is so horrified, I wonder?

Aeschylus sets Agamemnon and The Libation Bearers on the threshold of the royal palace. Her enmity for her husband continued to increase as she received reports of his infidelity with other women while on campaign at Troy.

Icke also became fascinated by the formal daring of the dramas, especially the extraordinary scene at the end of The Libation Bearers. The army boarded its ships and set sail for Troy. Unfortunately for Clytemnestra though Apollo brings up that Athena was never born by natural birth and never had a mother to raise her.

The chorus of Libation bearers not only differs from that of the Agamemnon but also develops. Pray that on them there come a god or a man- Electra: The ancient Furies are transformed into benevolent spirits.

Clytemnestra herself also uses language usually reserved for male characters. The third, Eumenides, releases the drama from this blood-clotted atmosphere, this feedback loop of horror, and brings to bear civic, judicial processes that at last have the power to neutralise and contain the seemingly endless pattern of vengeance.

Clytemnestra and Gender Roles

On the one hand, Lefkowitz When Atreus died, the throne of Argos was inherited by his son Agamemnon, who married Clytaemestra, the daughter of the king of Sparta. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: Orestes slaughters Clytemnestra and Aegisthus and the grisly tableau of dismembered limbs is repeated.

Aeschylus’ Libation Bearers Essay

Their name is changed to the Eumenides, or "kindly ones," to symbolize their new character. When the Chorus is commenting upon the action they do so through song and music. The basis of the theory of relativism is adaptability; we cannot say that our beliefs are superior or more moral than any other society for beliefs are all relative to the time and culture of where we are, which constantly change.

The action of The Choephori, the second play, takes place a few years later. Finally he arrives at Athens and throws himself on the mercy of the goddess Athene. Pursued by the Furies, Orestes flees to Delphi where he begs for absolution from the Oracle.

Worth noting here is the metaphorical aspect of this entire drama.

Implications of Gender Roles in Oresteia

Ancient tradition says that on the play's premiere this struck so much fear and anguish in the audience, that a pregnant woman named Neaira suffered a miscarriage and died on the spot. The other son of Atreus, Menelaus, married Helen, the sister of Clytaemestra, and in due course became the king of Sparta when her father died.

Electra wants to be more in control and assured of herself than what she believes her mother is, and she looks to her father for this assurance.

This masculine representation continues in the behaviours and activities Clytemnestra adopts, culminating in the murder of her husband. Unlike Electra, Clytemnestra was not going to let any man go walking without justice.This thesis will examine the characters of Clytemnestra and Electra in Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Electra, and Euripides’ Electra, especially investigating how Clytemnestra and Electra reject their feminine roles for masculine ones.

During this discussion, it is important. From the perspective of this chapter the most salient passage in Aeschylus’ play is the climactic ‘stand-off’ between Clytemnestra and the chorus.

She looms over the corpses of her husband and his captive priestess, and the chorus banish her from Argos. Rebellious Performances: An Examination of the Gender Roles of Clytemnestra and Electra Bethany Nickerson University of Colorado Boulder This thesis will examine the characters of Clytemnestra and Electra in Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Sophocles’ Electra, and Euripides’ Electra.

s for killing Clytemnestra; he is acquitted. At first glance, and even if one were prepared to admit that a finely tuned contemporary feminist social critique of Aeschylus would illustrate nothing so much as that each age seems capable of showing its moral and ethical superiority to and distinction from preceding ages, a presumptive misogyny endemic to.

The Oresteia (Ancient Greek: Ὀρέστεια) is a trilogy of Greek tragedies written by Aeschylus which concerns the end of the curse on the House of Atreus. When originally performed it was accompanied by Proteus, a satyr play that would have been performed following the trilogy; it has not survived.

This quote shows the chorus partaking in a more minor intervention of the narrative but as this is seen at the beginning of the play, it can be seen as an introduction to the chorus’ future, more significant, intervention.

Bibliography. Aeschylus.

The Oresteia: Aeschylus

The Libation Bearers. The Oresteia. Edited by David Greene and Wendy Doniger O’Flaherty.

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The gender roles of electra and clytemnestra in the play oresteia by aeschylus
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